The Cry of a Subversive Patriot

Editor’s note: This summer we are digging through our archives and re-posting some of our favorite stories from the last nine years of the CP blog. Today, as those in the U.S. prepare to celebrate Independence Day, we are re-posting this Fourth of July reflection from Ryan, the translation manager here at China Partnership.

This updated version has been lightly edited and re-formatted.


How I’ve Been Shaped By America

My friend Hannah eloquently and thoughtfully reflected on how her life has been shaped by China on this blog a few weeks ago. This motivated me to consider, on this Fourth of July holiday, how my life has been shaped by my experience in America. Much of my reflection is based on my own experience as a Chinese immigrant, but I hope you can all affirm my conclusion.

““This has also meant reserving my Chinese-ness to my home and a few allotted spaces in order not to stand out among my friends.”

Shortly after my family arrived in the United States, my uncle handed me a history of the U.S. written in Chinese. I gobbled the book in two weeks and was immediately captivated by the personalities and idealism behind America’s founding. I was particularly fascinated by the story of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, lifelong friends who both died on the fiftieth anniversary of America’s founding. I was proud to know more about American history than any of my American friends in high school, and even prouder as my parents and I took our oath to become American citizens in 2005. My fascination grew into an obsession with American presidents, politics, John Adams, and culminated in choosing government and American Studies as my majors in college.

Many of my teachers in China told me that, if a nation is compared to a canvas, then China is an ancient painting on which the strokes of history have been layered over and over through thousands of years, with little room for change or improvement. They would say the United States, on the other hand, is still very much a blank canvas with opportunities to grow and improve. While that may be a fitting analogy to portray the historical baggage of modern China, the longer I study American history and live here, the more I have found that analogy less accurate for the U.S. Young though it may be, the relative brevity of American history permits more in-depth study of this country’s social problems and historical contradictions.

Where Is My Place In This Nation?

The lofty ideals and heroic sacrifices of the United States’ founding generation were not enough to stop the growth of slavery, a legacy that still haunts us. Even today, my own alma mater – the nation’s first Catholic university, founded the same year as the American Republic – reconciles with a shocking history of Jesuit leaders selling 272 black slaves to raise money for the school. Yet the abolition of slavery after a bitter civil war did not end racial injustice across the nation as Jim Crow laws dominated for the next century, along with the continuing slaughter of Native Americans, Chinese expulsion acts, Japanese internments, and many other measures of discrimination against ethnic minorities and immigrants. This month, my own denomination finally passed an overture in our general assembly to “recognize, confess, condemn, and repent of corporate and historical sins, including those committed during the Civil Rights era, and continuing racial sins of ourselves and our fathers.” All the while, our nation continues to grapple with police violence and injustice against ethnic minorities in our criminal justice system.

As a church, we cry out, “How long?” As a Chinese immigrant, I ask, “Where is my place in this nation?” When a racial riot broke out in my hometown in 2001, I sinfully joined in with my white classmates and wondered, “Why couldn’t these guys just behave themselves and not cause any trouble?” But then a different question came to my mind, “What do I have to do in this country to appear normal?” Does it mean I have to work extra hard to get rid of my Chinese accent, make white friends, study American history in an elite college, and marry a white girl? As it turns out, I have done all of these (minus the accent part).

This has also meant reserving my Chinese-ness to my home and a few allotted spaces in order not to stand out among my friends.

““This Fourth of July, I hope you can join me in taking pride in our achievements as a nation and celebrate all the blessings that God has given us in this country. Yet we should be quick to understand that others too have many reasons to take pride in their own cultures.”

The initial temptation is to see this as a political problem with political answers. The liberals offer an attractive narrative of acceptance and love, but the narrative requires any deep convictions of universal Truth to remain personal and private. The celebration of personal authenticity can indeed be freeing to some, but it may be a freedom to further enslave ourselves to false idols. The conservatives offer a narrative of national moral righteousness and “Judeo-Christian” values – a narrative of which I was never fully convinced – but their clamor to restore these values cannot cover up their deafening silence on issues such as slavery, racial discrimination of various kinds, and the continuing systematic injustice that has left so many downtrodden people helpless in their own society. Their vision to restore America to a supposed former greatness often makes me wonder whether this “greatness” has a place for people like me.


Never miss a story

Sign up to receive our weekly email with our original articles.

Yet as I offer this personal critique, I also remember the way the heroic ideals and sacrifices of our Founding Fathers shone through as a resilient nation came together after 9/11. Regardless of political affiliation, I could see the progress of justice through the inauguration of our nation’s first African-American president. I am grateful for the opportunity in this nation to come to Christ and worship God with his people in freedom. I am proud to be a citizen of this nation.

I remember once in high school I had a chance to meet our former Congressman, who was on the rise to become a powerful national figure at the time. When I told him through my nervous, thick Chinese accent, “You are the highest official I have ever met,” he gently placed his arm around my shoulder and said, “Hey, we both put on our pants the same way.” That simple gesture from a Congressman to a timid Chinese high school student reflected so much what is beautiful about America.

Called Into the Kingdom of God

So on this Fourth of July, I hope you can join me in taking pride in our achievements as a nation and celebrate all the blessings that God has given us in this country. Yet we should be quick to understand that others too have many reasons to take pride in their own cultures. If there is any claim to exceptionalism in American, it is the sparkling light of the American mosaic that makes our society vibrant and beautiful. I pray that my own Chinese culture, along with African-American cultures, Arab cultures, Latino cultures, and many others, may shine as brightly in this society as the array of Caucasian cultures. And we must also remember that despite the country’s progress and ideals, neither America nor the march of democracy and liberty is the fulfillment of history.

““I am a subversive patriot because, despite the progress we have made as a nation, America is not my best hope for ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.’”

When I took my citizenship oath in the summer of 2005, I renounced my fidelity to any foreign sovereignty and pledged my allegiance to the Constitution of the United States of America. Nevertheless, I must admit that at best I can only be a subversive patriot, not because I am looking for opportunities to betray my country, but because I have been called into the Kingdom of God. Every day of my life – when I see injustice, violence, evil, sickness – I will pray that the people of this Kingdom will be a light in darkness and that the glory and authority of our King will soon be fully established in our world.

I am a subversive patriot because, despite the progress we have made as a nation, America is not my best hope for “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” My ultimate allegiance is to a King who gave up his own life, liberty, and happiness to redeem us from the tyranny of sin so that these may truly become our “unalienable rights,” not just in this world, but eternally. I am a subversive patriot, who in the process of seeking a good life in America, discovered “that I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Savior Jesus Christ… who by his Holy Spirit, He also assures me of eternal life, and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto him.”


Ryan moved from Guangzhou, China, to Ohio at the age of 12. He is the pastor for neighborhood ministries at New City Presbyterian Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, and also serves as the translation manager for China Partnership. 

FOR PRAYER AND REFLECTION

Pray for Christians to work for the good of their earthly countries, even as they give their ultimate allegiance to Jesus, King of all nations.

Share This Story

Further Reading

shio-yang-g_C8w1QBca0-unsplash
Nanjing: Love Under Pressure
Read More
zhang-kaiyv-L9NHlk2CGOQ-unsplash
Why Should I Love My Enemies?: Give Up Revenge, Love Enemies
Read More
yifei-wong-HfLKjg2ic64-unsplash
Nanjing: Bringing the Gospel Into Life
Read More

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA

With rising pressure and persecution in China, there are two challenges imperative for church leaders. The first challenge is for current leaders to love Christ above all else, and not to stray into legalism or love of the world. The second challenge is to raise up the next generation of leaders, who will humbly model Jesus even if current leaders are arrested.

WILL YOU JOIN US IN PRAYING FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA? PRAY FOR:

  1. Current leaders to grow in their daily walks with Christ
  2. Current leaders to shepherd and raise up new leaders
  3. New leaders who love Christ and will model him to the world
  4. New leaders to love and care for the church

Videos

ABOUT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

About Shenyang

Shenyang is a city located in northeastern China and is the capital of Liaoning Province. It is known for its rich history and cultural heritage, including the Shenyang Imperial Palace, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Shenyang is also a hub for China’s heavy industry, with companies such as the China First Automobile Group and the Shenyang Aircraft Corporation having their headquarters in the city.

Videos

Stories from Shenyang

About Qingdao

Qingdao is a city located in eastern China and is famous for its beaches, beer, and seafood. The city is home to several landmarks, including the Zhanqiao Pier and the Badaguan Scenic Area. Qingdao is also a major port and has a thriving economy, with industries such as electronics, petrochemicals, and machinery.

Videos

Stories from Qingdao

About Xiamen

Xiamen is a city located in southeastern China and is a popular tourist destination known for its beautiful coastal scenery, including Gulangyu Island, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The city is also a hub for China’s high-tech industry, with companies such as Huawei and ZTE having research and development centers in Xiamen.

Videos

Stories from Xiamen

About Chongqing

Chongqing is a city located in southwestern China and is a major economic center in the region. The city is known for its spicy cuisine, especially its hot pot dishes, and is also famous for the Three Gorges Dam, the world’s largest hydroelectric dam. Chongqing is also home to several historic sites, including the Dazu Rock Carvings, which are UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Videos

Stories from Chongqing

About Nanjing

Nanjing is a city located in eastern China and is the capital of Jiangsu Province. It is one of China’s ancient capitals and has a rich cultural history, including the Ming Xiaoling Mausoleum, the Nanjing City Wall, and the Confucius Temple. Nanjing is also a modern city with a thriving economy and is home to several universities, including Nanjing University and Southeast University.

Videos

Stories from Nanjing

About Changchun

Changchun is a city located in northeastern China and is the capital of Jilin Province. It is known for its rich cultural heritage and is home to several historical landmarks such as the Puppet Emperor’s Palace and the Jingyuetan National Forest Park. Changchun is also a hub for China’s automotive industry, with several major automobile manufacturers having their headquarters in the city.

Videos

Stories from Changchun

About Guangzhou

Guangzhou, also known as Canton, is a city located in southern China and is the capital of Guangdong Province. It is one of the country’s largest and most prosperous cities, serving as a major transportation and trading hub for the region. Guangzhou is renowned for its modern architecture, including the Canton Tower and the Guangzhou Opera House, as well as its Cantonese cuisine, which is famous for its variety and bold flavors. The city also has a rich history, with landmarks such as the Chen Clan Ancestral Hall, the Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall, and the Temple of the Six Banyan Trees. Additionally, Guangzhou hosts the annual Canton Fair, the largest trade fair in China.

Videos

Stories from Guangzhou

About Kunming

Kunming is a city located in southwest China and is the capital of Yunnan Province. Known as the “City of Eternal Spring” for its mild climate, Kunming is a popular tourist destination due to its natural beauty and cultural diversity. The city is home to several scenic spots, including the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Stone Forest, Dian Lake, and the Western Hills. Kunming is also famous for its unique cuisine, which features a mix of Han, Yi, and Bai ethnic flavors. The city has a rich cultural history, with ancient temples and shrines like the Yuantong Temple and the Golden Temple, and it’s also a hub for Yunnan’s ethnic minority cultures, such as the Yi and Bai peoples.

Videos

Stories from Kunming

About Shenzhen

Shenzhen is a city located in southeastern China and is one of the country’s fastest-growing metropolises. The city is renowned for its thriving tech industry, with companies such as Huawei, Tencent, and DJI having their headquarters in Shenzhen. The city also has a vibrant cultural scene, with numerous museums, art galleries, and parks. Shenzhen is also known for its modern architecture, such as the Ping An Finance Center and the Shenzhen Bay Sports Center. Despite its modernization, Shenzhen also has a rich history and cultural heritage, with landmarks such as the Dapeng Fortress and the Chiwan Tin Hau Temple.

Videos

Stories from Shenzhen

About Chengdu

Chengdu is a city located in the southwestern region of China, and the capital of Sichuan province. It has a population of over 18 million people, and it is famous for its spicy Sichuan cuisine, laid-back lifestyle, and its cute and cuddly residents – the giant pandas. Chengdu is home to the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, where visitors can observe these adorable creatures in their natural habitat. The city also boasts a rich cultural heritage, with numerous temples, museums, and historical sites scattered throughout its boundaries. Chengdu is a city of contrasts, with ancient traditions coexisting alongside modern developments, making it an intriguing and fascinating destination for visitors to China. 

Videos

Stories from Chengdu

About Beijing

Beijing is the capital city of China and one of the most populous cities in the world, with a population of over 21 million people. The city has a rich history that spans over 3,000 years, and it has served as the capital of various dynasties throughout China’s history. Beijing is home to some of the most iconic landmarks in China, including the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and the Temple of Heaven. The city is also a hub for political, cultural, and educational activities, with numerous universities and research institutions located within its boundaries. Beijing is renowned for its traditional architecture, rich cuisine, and vibrant cultural scene, making it a must-visit destination for travelers to China.

Videos

Stories from Beijing

About Shanghai

Shanghai is a vibrant and dynamic city located on the eastern coast of China. It is the largest city in China and one of the most populous cities in the world, with a population of over 24 million people. Shanghai is a global financial hub and a major center for international trade, with a rich history and culture that spans over 1,000 years. The city is famous for its iconic skyline, which features towering skyscrapers such as the Oriental Pearl Tower and the Shanghai Tower. Shanghai is also home to a diverse culinary scene, world-class museums and art galleries, and numerous shopping districts. It is a city that is constantly evolving and reinventing itself, making it a fascinating destination for visitors from around the world.

Videos

Stories from Shanghai

give

A short message about partnering with us.